June 2010

Chinese Diplomat elected to International Court of Justice

Xue Hanqin.jpgXUE HANQIN, a veteran Chinese diplomat and an expert in international law, was elected judge of the International Court of Justice on Tuesday.

Xue, a member of the International Law Commission, was elected by the U.N. General Assembly and the Security Council in separate votes.

Xue won all 15 Security Council votes, said Claude Heller, the Mexican U.N. ambassador who holds the rotating Security Council presidency for June.

Heller, at the open Council meeting, also read a letter from the president of the General Assembly, Ali Treki, who said that Xue won a majority of votes in the 192-nation U.N. body.

The election was conducted under the relevant Security Council resolution to fill the vacancy after Judge Shi Jiuyong, a Chinese, resigned May 28.

She is the only female among the 15 judges of the International Court of Justice, and the third Chinese national to serve on the court.

In December 2008, Xue was appointed as China’s first ambassador to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

Xue Hanqin.jpg

Xue Hanqin.jpg

Foxconn + Apple + The China Price = A lack of common sense

foxxcon.jpgOk, I will acknowledge at the outset that this writing involves a bit of banging the drum on my part because everybody out there seems to be focusing on the wrong part of this equation.   

We live here in Shenzhen near the now notorious Foxconn campus so famous for suicides related to the assembly of Apple products. We have been here for coming on ten years running this law firm and we like it.  It's a great place to live, run a business, train Chinese lawyers and raise kids.  It is home.

But my complaint is this.  Apple does not seem to want to pay more for I-pads, I-pods or whatever because the consumer does not want to pay more for I-pods.

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foxxcon.jpg

Shenzhen China - Senior Government posts open to competition

ballot_box.jpgThe weekend edition of the Shenzhen Daily has reported eight senior government posts will be up for competition for the first time, making the beginning of a low-profile yet ambitious experiment aimed at introducing open elections for high-ranking officials.

What? China!! Elections. But they are communist, right?  

It would seem that elections may be on the horizon.  The nominations for these eight posts can be from within the Government itself, but individuals are also allowed to nominate themselves too. The candidates will be interviewed by a 75 member panel who will vote on them with the ballot results announced instantly.  The entire process will be completed by mid-July 2010.

Apparently, Shenzhen has decided to place itself at the forefront of the country's political reform after almost 30 years of being on the cutting edge of economic reform.    

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ballot_box.jpg

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ballot-box.jpg

But I paid him money in China...

                                        

We have been getting a lot of requests for assistance to recover money mooooney.jpgpaid out to a Chinese National person or business and in a large number of cases we are not able offer any commercially reasonable assistance because of the way the money was literally given away before anyone called us in for help.

This has involved commercial transactions, personal loans and in one case it was many millions of dollars in a real estate purchase.  But in  each case, we were not able to recover these sums paid for various  reasons.

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mooooney.jpg